The Twickenham Museum
For children

Richmond Road
The highway to Richmond Ferry
1443

Detail from John Rocque's map of 1741-5 showing the road pattern to the east of Twickenham and Ferry Lane

An ancient trackTwickenham lies in a great bend of the River Thames. Until the 18th century roads were little more than dirt tracks used by people on foot or slow moving carts, carriages, horses and other beasts.

An ancient track led from Church Street in the centre of Twickenham village to Richmond ferry (close to the present site of Richmond bridge). This ferry was first recorded in 1443 and could carry people, animals and carts across the river.

Ryde House, Richmond Road, East Twickenham.

A rural scene

In the 17th century there was very little housing in this part of Twickenham. The track crossed the unfenced Great East Field, with its "butts" (mounds of earth with targets for archery practise), riverside pastures and a rabbit warren. It then passed along the boundary of Twickenham Park.

The occasional highwayman held up the richer looking travellers.

Willoughby House, Willoughby Road, near Richmond Bridge.

Richmond Road today

Over the centuries, Richmond Road has seen many changes. Houses have been built on much of the open land and the road has been widened and surfaced.

Once the rural scene of slow moving carts and coaches it is now a busy urban thoroughfare.

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