The Twickenham Museum
Schools

Heathfield Junior School

Dorel Ruxton writes:

HEATHFIELD WAS A HAPPY SCHOOL, IM INTERESTED IN TRACING ANY OF MY PAST SCHOOL FRIENDS E.G. BARBARA SINTHORPE, NINA PIESLEY, CHRISTINE CURLY,WE HAD MRS. MITCHELL AS A VERY GOOD HEADMISTRESS,MRS. GROVE JONES WAS MY LAST FORM TEACHER, I WAS THERE FROM 1946 TO 1949.
Email: dorel.ruxton@virgin.net
Pauline G Wadl writes:

The main building was near the gate from Powder Mill Lane. It included a clock, where badly behaved pupils were told to stand. The rest of the buildings were wooden huts. The toilets were outside. In 1935 the infants' teacher was Miss Piper. There was squishy clay in buckets. Each classroom had a coke stove and a lobby for coats.

Miss Chater lived near the Crystal Palace and saw it on fire in 1936. In 1935 we received Jubilee mugs, and in 1937 we had Coronation mugs. We sang songs on Empire Day, Bluebells of Scotland, Land of my Fathers, etc. We learned 'Overheard on a Saltmarsh' by H H Munro and performed at a festival. The girls made needlework aprons and embroidered them in silks, blue and gold, or red and green.

About 1939 we had to try on our gasmasks and have the straps adjusted to fit. We spent part of some lessons wearing them. We had to go to the air-raid shelters often. Nelson School had to share our building for a while. We went Monday, Wednesday and Friday one week, Tuesday Thursday and Saturday the next.

In winter we made a long slide across the concrete and had snowball fights with the teachers in the field. The girls made summer dresses by hand and wore them. When we were cold, we did exercises. We bought National Savings Stamps once a week. Once there was an explosion, and we all went under our desks (maybe a land-mine).

A pupil died of diptheria and a wreath was sent from the school.

When we left to go to Secondary School we received a book and a card from Miss Mitchell, our class teacher.
Patricia Whetton writes:

I went to Heathfield from 1955 until 1961. A wonderful school, I have many happy memories. The Headmistress of the Infants School was Miss Wills. There was a mural on the back wall of the hall of all the nursery rhymes you could think of - an enormous cow jumping over the moon. I loved playing Post Offices. Miss Mitchell was headmistress of the Junior School. A lady who appeared fierce, but was really very soft. She could not bring herself to give anyone the cane, so this was left to Mr Marrison, who was my teacher for 2 years. If it were not for him I would not have passed my 11+ and gone on to Twickenham County Grammar School for Girls.

Email: patwhetton@hotmail.com